Difference between revisions of "Places in Gramps"

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{{languages|Places in GRAMPS}}
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{{languages|Places in Gramps}}
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An overview of countries with the relevant genealogical information about them:
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* genealogical organisations with contact information
 +
* digital archives you can consult online (free or fee based) with an appraisal
 +
* location of archives, and how to consult sources there
 +
* relevant history of the country viz-a-viz genealogy
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* pointers to locations in the country, with details (as always, relevant to genealogy, eg an abbey of which many sources are available, ...)
  
 
== What is a Place? ==
 
== What is a Place? ==
A [[GRAMPS_Glossary#P|Place]] in GRAMPS generally refers to where an event occurred. This is different to an Address (see for example [[Why residence event and not Address%3F]]).
 
The [[Gramps_3.4_Wiki_Manual_-_Main_Window#Places_Category|Places View]] lists all the places in your GRAMPS database, and is a handy spot to make sure your places are named consistently.
 
  
== Editing Places ==
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A [[Gramps_Glossary#P|Place]] in Gramps generally refers to where an event occurred. This is different to an Address (see for example [[Why residence event and not Address%3F]]).
[[Image:Edit-Place-1.png|300px|thumb|right|Fig. 1. Example Edit Place dialogue]]
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GRAMPS provides a window in which you can edit a place:
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A place is a geographical region of any size ranging from that of a country to a burial plot.  Boundaries of a place may vary over time.  The latitude and longitude of an approximate centre point can be recorded.
  
Use the [[Place completion tool]] to help automate the management of your places, as this allows you to edit several places in one go. It is also an easy way to determine and include latitude and longitude of cities and towns.
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A Gramps ID and place type can be specified.
<br clear="all" /br>
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== Organising your Places ==
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There are several ways you could organise your places. The concept of a place in genealogy is very complex, due both to the level of detail you wish to capture, and the changes over time to the name of a place. Ultimately how much of this complexity you record in your database is up to you, but you will probably find it advantageous to consider your options before you have too many places in your data.
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The summary below indicates some of the ways current GRAMPS users organise their places.  
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Notes and media can also be attached to a place.
  
=== Level of detail ===
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== Place names ==
The level of detail recorded for a place affects the number of places you have. One option is to not include detail finer than town or city in a place, in which case the ''Street'' field is always left empty. When further detail is to be recorded for an event, it can go in a note associated with that event. This has the advantage that your places are easier to manage, and can appear more consistent in reports. A disadvantage is that you may need to include the same note text against many events, for example if they all occurred at the one address.
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In GRAMPS 3.0 you can have multiple notes, making copy/paste of this address in a note easier. You could also add the place ones to the source used for the event. Another possible disadvantage is that the place details may not be displayed in reports in the way you wish.
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The other extreme is to specify as fine detail as possible, which may involve putting a lot of information into the ''Street'' field. A drawback is that you will end up with a very large number of Place entries.
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A place is identified by a name which may change over time and can be entered in different languages.  For example, the city of Saint Petersburg in Russia could be defined with the following names:
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* Санкт-Петербу́рг (1703-1914) [ru]
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* Петрогра́д (1914-1924) [ru]
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* Ленингра́д (1924-1991) [ru]
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* Санкт-Петербу́рг (1991-) [ru]
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* Saint Petersburg (1703-1914) [en]
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* Petrograd (1914-1924) [en]
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* Leningrad (1924-1991) [en]
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* Saint Petersburg (1991-) [en]
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Assuming the default Places [[Gramps_4.2_Wiki_Manual_-_Settings#Places|Preferences]] settings of auto-generation of titles is enabled,
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automatic place title generation will choose the appropriate name, given the date of an event and the language code specified in the preferences.  Where there is no event date available, or if the place is displayed without reference to an event, then today's date is used.
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Each name is processed in turn.  A name is matched if the date range contains the event date and the language code is the same as the language preference setting.  An empty date range is interpreted as matching any date.  If there is no language code match, names defined with an empty language code are used as a fallback.
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The main name is processed before the alternative names.
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[[File:SaintPeterburgFullNames.png|600px|thumb|right|Fig. 1. Saint Petersburg Place example]]
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For example, Figure 1 shows the Place view for the above described Saint Petersburg. Note the order of the entries, the date ranges, and the language codes.
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{{-}}
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[[File:EventViewSaintPeterburgPlace.png|600px|thumb|right|Fig. 2. Saint Petersburg Event example]]
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Events can be created at specific dates for this place and the title generation will follow the rules above. In the first event in Figure 2, the title generated is '?' because the place has no entries for this date (1500 is not between 1703 and today). In the second event in Figure 2, the generated title - Петрогра́д - corresponds to the first place that matches the date range since the language preference setting is blank. In the fourth event, again the generated title is the first place that matches the date range. Note that the order of the Alternate Names in Figure 1 is important in title generation when the default language is blank. If the Language is specified in the Places [[Gramps_4.2_Wiki_Manual_-_Settings#Places|Preferences]], then that language will be used if found. If the language is not found, the first date match will be used.
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The title generation is done at the event update, and it not refreshed if the Place is edited. In the case where the Place is updated, the event would have to be subsequently updated as well to regenerate the title with the corresponding change in the Place.
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{{-}}
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== Place hierarchy ==
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[[File:SaintPeterburgPlaceHierarchy.png|600px|thumb|right|Fig. 3. Saint Petersburg Place Hierarchy example]]
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Places can be linked together to form a hierarchy.  This enables different places with the same name to be distinguished from each other.  For example, there are also places called Saint Petersburg outside of Russia:
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* Saint Petersburg --> Russia
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* Saint Petersburg --> Colorado --> USA
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* St. Petersburg --> Florida --> USA
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* St. Petersburg --> Pennsylvania --> USA
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A title can be generated by following the links.  So "Saint Petersburg, Russia" would describe the city in Russia. Figure 3 illustrates the Place Editor view (with autogenerated titles) for these cities.
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{{-}}
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[[File:AlsacePlaceHierarchy.png|600px|thumb|right|Fig. 4. Alsace Place Hierarchy example]]
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The place hierarchy can also be used in filters, to find all places located in another place.
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Multiple links with date ranges are allowed.  This makes possible more complex cases where a place moves from being located within one place into another.  Alsace makes a good example:
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* Alsace -(1618–1674)-> Holy Roman Empire
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* Alsace -(1674–1871)-> France
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* Alsace -(1871–1918)-> Germany
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* Alsace -(1919–1940)-> France
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* Alsace -(1940–1944)-> Germany
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* Alsace -(1945–)-> France
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{{-}}
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[[File:EventViewAlsacePlace.png|600px|thumb|right|Fig. 4. Events with different dates in Alsace example]]
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Figure 5 is the Event Editor view which illustrates that the generated title for an event is based on the date of the event when traversing the place hierarchy. 
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{{-}}
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== Source description ==
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Places in the hierarchy provide standardized titles.  Event attributes with a key of "Place" can be used to record places as described in a source.
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This allows spelling variations to be recorded without the need to create extra places.  It also allows more than one place to be recorded for an event.
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For example, an event in Saint Petersburg could have two citations. One may describe the place as "Saint Petersburg" and the other "St. Petersburg".
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== Editing Places ==
  
An approach that is between the above two involves treating a place as a geographic location on the Earth. The land use (e.g. St Luke's Church) would be a note. How you identify the geographic location may not always be obvious: a street address (e.g. 25 High St) will often be sufficient.
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The {{icon|plac}} [[Gramps_4.2_Wiki_Manual_-_Categories#Places_Category|Places Category View]] lists all the places in your Gramps database, and is a handy spot to make sure your places are named consistently.
  
No matter which approach you take, you will probably end up with some place entries more general that others. For example, you may well end up with a place ''Australia'', and another ''Tasmania, Australia'', and another ''Hobart, Tasmania, Australia''.
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Gramps also provides a [[Gramps_4.2_Wiki_Manual_-_Entering_and_editing_data:_detailed_-_part_2#Place_Editor_dialog|window in which you can edit a place]]:
=== Changes over time ===
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A given place can change its name over time. This change may be as minor as a change in street number or name, or a complete change in name of town and country. There are different ways of recording this, but most people seem to choose one name which they list on the Location tab, and the other names go on the Alternate Locations tab.
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Some put the modern day details in the Location tab, and historical details under Alternate Locations. This has at least two drawbacks:
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[[File:Place editor 42.png|450px|thumb|right|Fig. 5. Example Edit Place dialogue]]
  
# You may not know the modern day details for a place when entering it.
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Enter the ''Name'' and ''Type'' of the place in the fields provided. The ''ID'' field will be populated automatically by Gramps.
# If the modern details change, you have to remember to update everything.  
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Other people prefer to put in the Location tab the details as they were at the time of the event, and the modern details under Alternate Locations. This also is not perfect, as you need to decide what to do if you have two different events at the same place, but separated in time such that the place details differ. You would make two different places then, for the same place.
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The ''Code'' can be used to store a country code or postal code.
  
=== ''Place Name'' field ===
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The region in which the place belongs should be recorded in the ''Enclosed By'' tab.  Every place except for countries should have at least one entry.  Multiple entries are useful to record a place that has been part of different administrative regions over time.  The first entry in the list will be used to construct default place titles.
The first field in the Edit Place window is generally displayed where space is limited, such as in some graphical reports. Therefore some people like to put in here a short descriptive name.
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Other people prefer this field to be a repeat of all the fields in the location tab in the bottom of the window. It can be listed either from the most specific, or the least.
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Variations of a place name over time or different language versions, can be recorded in the ''Alternative Names'' tab.
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{{-}}
  
For example, for a location of ''Street'': Rundle Mall, ''City:'' Adelaide, ''State:'' South Australia, ''Country:'' Australia, ''Postal Code:'' 5000, different people would set the ''Place Name'' field to one of:
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== Known Issues ==
  
* Rundle Mall
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* The place views and event editors always display the modern place title.
* Rundle Mall, Adelaide
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* The mechanism for selecting an existing place or adding a new place needs improving.
* Rundle Mall, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia
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* The place tree view only displays each place once.
* Australia, 5000, South Australia, Adelaide, Rundle Mall
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* Using an empty language code for endonyms, makes entering some place names cumbersome.
  
There are, of course, also minor variations on those listed above.
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== Possible future enhancements ==
  
Some people ensure the ''Place Name'' field has everything they want, and they leave the Location tab empty.
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* Time dependent place types
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* Hierarchy types in links between places
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* Import from the GOV database (See {{bug|8974}})
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* Experimental place gazetteer (See: {{bug|8812}})
  
== The future ==
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{{-}}
The developers have indicated that they believe the handling of places in GRAMPS could be improved, but as the current system is adequate and there many higher priority tasks, a reworking of the places in GRAMPS is not likely to happen for some time. Also, see [[GEPS_006:_Better_Place_handling|GEPS006 Better Place handling]].
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[[Category:Documentation]]
 
[[Category:Documentation]]
 
[[Category:Translators/Categories]]
 
[[Category:Translators/Categories]]
[[Category:GRAMPS terminology]]
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[[Category:Gramps terminology]]
 
[[Category:Places]]
 
[[Category:Places]]
 
[[Category:Tutorials]]
 
[[Category:Tutorials]]

Latest revision as of 17:15, 19 December 2016

An overview of countries with the relevant genealogical information about them:

  • genealogical organisations with contact information
  • digital archives you can consult online (free or fee based) with an appraisal
  • location of archives, and how to consult sources there
  • relevant history of the country viz-a-viz genealogy
  • pointers to locations in the country, with details (as always, relevant to genealogy, eg an abbey of which many sources are available, ...)

What is a Place?

A Place in Gramps generally refers to where an event occurred. This is different to an Address (see for example Why residence event and not Address?).

A place is a geographical region of any size ranging from that of a country to a burial plot. Boundaries of a place may vary over time. The latitude and longitude of an approximate centre point can be recorded.

A Gramps ID and place type can be specified.

Notes and media can also be attached to a place.

Place names

A place is identified by a name which may change over time and can be entered in different languages. For example, the city of Saint Petersburg in Russia could be defined with the following names:

  • Санкт-Петербу́рг (1703-1914) [ru]
  • Петрогра́д (1914-1924) [ru]
  • Ленингра́д (1924-1991) [ru]
  • Санкт-Петербу́рг (1991-) [ru]
  • Saint Petersburg (1703-1914) [en]
  • Petrograd (1914-1924) [en]
  • Leningrad (1924-1991) [en]
  • Saint Petersburg (1991-) [en]

Assuming the default Places Preferences settings of auto-generation of titles is enabled, automatic place title generation will choose the appropriate name, given the date of an event and the language code specified in the preferences. Where there is no event date available, or if the place is displayed without reference to an event, then today's date is used.

Each name is processed in turn. A name is matched if the date range contains the event date and the language code is the same as the language preference setting. An empty date range is interpreted as matching any date. If there is no language code match, names defined with an empty language code are used as a fallback.

The main name is processed before the alternative names.

Fig. 1. Saint Petersburg Place example

For example, Figure 1 shows the Place view for the above described Saint Petersburg. Note the order of the entries, the date ranges, and the language codes.

Fig. 2. Saint Petersburg Event example

Events can be created at specific dates for this place and the title generation will follow the rules above. In the first event in Figure 2, the title generated is '?' because the place has no entries for this date (1500 is not between 1703 and today). In the second event in Figure 2, the generated title - Петрогра́д - corresponds to the first place that matches the date range since the language preference setting is blank. In the fourth event, again the generated title is the first place that matches the date range. Note that the order of the Alternate Names in Figure 1 is important in title generation when the default language is blank. If the Language is specified in the Places Preferences, then that language will be used if found. If the language is not found, the first date match will be used.

The title generation is done at the event update, and it not refreshed if the Place is edited. In the case where the Place is updated, the event would have to be subsequently updated as well to regenerate the title with the corresponding change in the Place.

Place hierarchy

Fig. 3. Saint Petersburg Place Hierarchy example

Places can be linked together to form a hierarchy. This enables different places with the same name to be distinguished from each other. For example, there are also places called Saint Petersburg outside of Russia:

  • Saint Petersburg --> Russia
  • Saint Petersburg --> Colorado --> USA
  • St. Petersburg --> Florida --> USA
  • St. Petersburg --> Pennsylvania --> USA

A title can be generated by following the links. So "Saint Petersburg, Russia" would describe the city in Russia. Figure 3 illustrates the Place Editor view (with autogenerated titles) for these cities.


Fig. 4. Alsace Place Hierarchy example

The place hierarchy can also be used in filters, to find all places located in another place.

Multiple links with date ranges are allowed. This makes possible more complex cases where a place moves from being located within one place into another. Alsace makes a good example:

  • Alsace -(1618–1674)-> Holy Roman Empire
  • Alsace -(1674–1871)-> France
  • Alsace -(1871–1918)-> Germany
  • Alsace -(1919–1940)-> France
  • Alsace -(1940–1944)-> Germany
  • Alsace -(1945–)-> France


Fig. 4. Events with different dates in Alsace example

Figure 5 is the Event Editor view which illustrates that the generated title for an event is based on the date of the event when traversing the place hierarchy.

Source description

Places in the hierarchy provide standardized titles. Event attributes with a key of "Place" can be used to record places as described in a source.

This allows spelling variations to be recorded without the need to create extra places. It also allows more than one place to be recorded for an event.

For example, an event in Saint Petersburg could have two citations. One may describe the place as "Saint Petersburg" and the other "St. Petersburg".

Editing Places

The Places Places Category View lists all the places in your Gramps database, and is a handy spot to make sure your places are named consistently.

Gramps also provides a window in which you can edit a place:

Fig. 5. Example Edit Place dialogue

Enter the Name and Type of the place in the fields provided. The ID field will be populated automatically by Gramps.

The Code can be used to store a country code or postal code.

The region in which the place belongs should be recorded in the Enclosed By tab. Every place except for countries should have at least one entry. Multiple entries are useful to record a place that has been part of different administrative regions over time. The first entry in the list will be used to construct default place titles.

Variations of a place name over time or different language versions, can be recorded in the Alternative Names tab.

Known Issues

  • The place views and event editors always display the modern place title.
  • The mechanism for selecting an existing place or adding a new place needs improving.
  • The place tree view only displays each place once.
  • Using an empty language code for endonyms, makes entering some place names cumbersome.

Possible future enhancements

  • Time dependent place types
  • Hierarchy types in links between places
  • Import from the GOV database (See 8974)
  • Experimental place gazetteer (See: 8812)